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Copy of letter from Duncan C. Scott

Item consists of copy of a letter from Duncan C .Scott of the Department of Indian Affairs dated Feb 27, 1919, copied 'Concordat cum originali, Calgariae; die 2 Septembris, 1919 by A.J. Hetherington.

Archbishop Andrea Cassulo, Apostolic Delegate to Canada and Newfoundland, Nov 2, 1927

Item consists of photograph of Archbishop Andrea Cassulo, Apostolic Delegate to Canada and Newfoundland. He paid an official visit to Calgary beginning November 2, 1927. Official reception at the Cathedral. During his stay he gave Benediction and preached at St. Angela's, Riverside, Calgary (in the school assembly hall being used then as a church), sermon being in Italian. Italians from everywhere packed the place. This picture taken at Lacombe Home where the Delegate was guest at lunch.
Includes duplicate print
In the picture:
Front row: Pat Burns, Bishop Kidd, Delegate, J.J. Duggan and Msgr. J.J. Blair of the Church Extension Society
Middle row: Fr. D. Moreau, J.B. Moriarty, A. Newman, A.J.H. (Hetherington), A. Luhowy (Ukrainian), N. Anderson, Thomas Greene
Back row: J.S. Smith, A.E. Rouleau, Fr. Bocchini

Cassulo, Archbishop Andrea

Department of Indian Affairs

File consists of a telegram and a letter from Duncan C. Scott, Deputy Superintendent General of the Department of Indian Affairs, to Bishop John T. McNally. The telegram [date?] reads: “Would appreciate letter from you supporting our new measure now before Parliament of compulsory attendance at residential Indian schools.” Below the words of the telegram, there is a handwritten reply from Bishop McNally to Scott, which reads: “Assuredly I approve the idea of compulsory attendance at residential Indian schools, as most promising [agency?] for [forming future civilization and citizenship?]. Various details of act, however, are not yet clear to me. Am leaving for Ottawa, and hope to see you early next week.”
The letter, dated February 27, 1919, is regarding the St. Joseph’s Industrial School at Dunbow. In light of the recent death of Fr. Nordmann, O.M.I., principal of the school, Scott asks Bishop McNally for his “special consideration of the present position of this school.” The Department of Indian Affairs was considering whether the school should be closed. According to Scott, one of the department’s “chief difficulties” at the Indian industrial schools was preventing the students “from being exploited as mere wage earners” and ensuring that they were taught English by “persons who have a thorough command of the language.” Scott writes that if the Bishop will place an English-speaking priest in charge of the school, then the department will “postpone definite action to close the institution” and will “co-operate” with the Bishop in working to increase the school’s attendance and making the school “a vital factor in Indian education.”
The Dominion Government closed St. Joseph’s Industrial School in 1922.

McNally, John T., 1871-1952